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Setting Healthy Boundaries

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Setting Healthy Boundaries in relatinships

Setting healthy boundaries is essential to relationship satisfaction,

whether it is at work, with family members, or friends.

In this video, Dr. Henry Cloud, an expert in boundaries, talks with Dave Ramsey about setting boundaries with family members.

Learn more about how he defines boundaries.

Healthy Boundaries in Recovery

While counseling at Hope House, a domestic violence shelter, Rita Witt, Vice President of Clinical Services for Hope House, described boundaries as a fence around a house and yard. Each fence represents an individual. In our relationships, our fences touch each other. We may invite others into our fenced in boundary, and we need to learn to protect our space.

Try this healthy boundary quiz!

Transform Boundary Setting

When we grow up in families without boundaries, abuse tends to happen. We tend to choose relationships with individuals like our abusers. Research has shown that in order to survive, children need to believe they are loved. Our minds twist abusive behaviors to convince ourselves that these behaviors are expressions of love. This is a basic survival technique.

How to Set Healthy Boundaries

Once we are out of those abusive situations, we no longer need to believe this to survive. Once we realize this, it is possible to transform boundaries with counseling, workshops, reading, and being with those who set healthy boundaries. Learning to set healthy boundaries is challenging. Counseling can help transform relationships with boundary setting.


Martha recommends reading Boundaries by Dr. Henry Cloud.
Want to talk? Make an appointment with me.

Photo credits: Keoni Cabral via photopin cc

Author: Martha Childers

Martha Childers, EdS, LPC is a psychotherapist specializing in helping individuals aged 50+, couples and women. Martha is a licensed professional counselor in Missouri and Kansas. She received her masters and education specialist degrees in counseling psychology from the University of Missouri – Kansas City. She practiced Zen through a variety of Japanese traditional arts for 3-1/2 years. Since that time, mindfulness has been an integral part of her life. Her interest in human nature, beliefs, and life styles led her to become a counselor.

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